• View as:
  • Filter your selection
  • Sort by:
  • MiG-19 1/48

    ED11141

    56,95
    ENGLISH

    Limited edition kit of Soviet Cold War jet fighter MiG-19 version S and PM in 1/48 scale.

    plastic parts: Trumpeter
    marking options: 8
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, pre-painted
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: yes, wheels and gun barrels

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición limitada del caza a reacción soviético de la Guerra Fría MiG-19 versión S y PM en escala 1/48.

    piezas de plástico: Trompetista
    opciones de marcado: 8
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, prepintadas
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: sí, ruedas y cañones de pistola

     

  • Spitfire Mk.Ia 1/48

    ED82151

    30,50
    ENGLISH

    Profipack edition kit of british WWII aircraft Spitifre Mk.I in 1/48 scale.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    marking options: 7
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, pre-painted
    painting mask: yes

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit edición profipack del avión británico de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Spitifre Mk.I en escala 1/48.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    opciones de marcado: 7
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, prepintadas
    máscara de pintura: sí

  • SERVUS CHLAPCI 1/72

    ED2131

    27,95
    ENGLISH

    Limited edition kit of Czechoslovak agricultural aircraft Z-37A Čmelák in 1/72 scale.

    Focused on machines from Czechoslovak, Czech and Slovak service.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    marking options: 12
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, pre-painted
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: yes, pilot figure

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición limitada del avión agrícola checoslovaco Z-37A Čmelák en escala 1/72.

    Centrado en máquinas de servicio checoslovaco, checo y eslovaco.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    opciones de marcado: 12
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, prepintadas
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: sí, figura piloto

  • MiG-21PFM 1/72

    ED7454

    12,50
    ENGLISH

    Weekend edition kit of Soviet Cold War jet fighter MiG-21PFM in 1/72 scale.

     

    plastic parts: Eduard
    marking options: 2
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask: no
    resin parts: no

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición de fin de semana del caza a reacción soviético MiG-21PFM de la Guerra Fría en escala 1/72.

     

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    opciones de marcado: 2
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: no
    piezas de resina: no

  • ADLERANGRIFF 1/32

    ED11107

    51,50
    ENGLISH

    Limited edition kit of German WWII fighter Bf 109E in 1/32 scale.

    Focused on version Bf 109E-1/3/4 from June to October 1940.

     

    plastic parts: Eduard
    marking options: 11
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, pre-painted
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: yes, wheels
    extra bonus: figure of Adolf Galland

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición limitada del caza alemán de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Bf 109E en escala 1/32.

    Centrado en la versión Bf 109E-1/3/4 de junio a octubre de 1940.

     

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    opciones de marcado: 11
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, prepintadas
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: sí, ruedas
    bono extra: figura de Adolf Galland

     

  • VERY LONG RANGE: Tales of Iwojima 1/48

    ED11142

    34,50
    ENGLISH

    Brand: Eduard
    Title: Very Long Range: Tales of Iwojima
    Number: 11142
    Scale: 1:48
    Type: Complete Kit

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Marca: Eduard
    Título: Very Long Range: Tales of Iwojima
    Número: 11142
    Escala: 1:48
    Tipo: Kit completo

  • THE SPITFIRE STORY 1/48

    ED11143

    56,95
    ENGLISH

    Brand: Eduard
    Title: The Spitfire Story Limited Edition Dual Combo
    Number: 11143
    Scale: 1:48
    Type: Complete Kit

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Marca: Eduard
    Título: The Spitfire Story Limited Edition Dual Combo
    Número: 11143
    Escala: 1:48
    Tipo: Kit completo

  • EDPACK06

    EDPACK06

    55,45 49,90
    ENGLISH

    Save your money with this amazing PACK!

     

    ESPAÑOL

    ¡Ahorra dinero con este increíble PACK!

     

  • EDPACK05

    EDPACK05

    52,90 47,50
    ENGLISH

    Save your money with this amazing PACK!

     

    ESPAÑOL

    ¡Ahorra dinero con este increíble PACK!

     

  • EDPACK04

    EDPACK04

    20,90 18,80
    ENGLISH

    Save your money with this amazing PACK!

     

    ESPAÑOL

    ¡Ahorra dinero con este increíble PACK!

     

  • EDPACK03

    EDPACK03

    56,15 51,65
    ENGLISH

    Save your money with this amazing PACK!

     

    ESPAÑOL

    ¡Ahorra dinero con este increíble PACK!

     

  • P-47D Bubbletop 1/144

    ED4464

    7,50
    ENGLISH

    Super 44 edition kit of US WWII fighter aircraft P-47D Bubbletop in 1/144 scale.

    • plastic parts: Platz
    • marking options: 5
    • decals: Eduard
    • PE parts: no
    • painting mask: yes
    • resin parts: no

    Marking options:

    A) P-47D-26-RA, s/n 42-28382, flown by Lt. James R. Hopkins, 509th FS, 405th FG, 9th AF, Ophoven, Belgium, March 1945

    B) P-47D-26-RA, s/n 42-28382, flown by Lt. James R. Hopkins, 509th FS, 405th FG, 9th AF, Ophoven, Belgium, March 1945

    C) P-47D-26-RA, s/n 42-28382, flown by Capt. Donavon F. Smith, CO of 61th FS, 56th FG, 8th AF, Boxted, United Kingdom, August 1944

    D) P-47D-30-RA, s/n 44-20866, flown by Lt. Frank J. Middleton, 65th FS, 57th FG, 12th AF, Corsica, Summer 1944

    E) P-47D-28-RA, s/n 42-29091, flown by Lt. Ralph Barnes, 310th FS, 58th FG, 5th AF, Machinato Airfield, Okinawa, 1945

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Súper 44 edición del avión de combate de la Segunda Guerra Mundial P-47D Bubbletop a escala 1/144.

    • piezas de plástico: Platz
    • opciones de marcado: 5
    • calcas: Eduard
    • Partes de PE: no
    • máscara de pintura: sí
    • partes de resina: no

    Opciones de marcado:

    A) P-47D-26-RA, s/n 42-28382, pilotado por el Teniente James R. Hopkins, 509º FS, 405º FG, 9º AF, Ophoven, Bélgica, marzo de 1945

    B) P-47D-26-RA, s/n 42-28382, volado por el Teniente James R. Hopkins, 509º FS, 405º FG, 9º AF, Ophoven, Bélgica, marzo de 1945

    C) P-47D-26-RA, s/n 42-28382, volado por el Capitán Donavon F. Smith, CO del 61º FS, 56º FG, 8º AF, Boxted, Reino Unido, agosto de 1944

    D) P-47D-30-RA, s/n 44-20866, volado por el Teniente Frank J. Middleton, 65º FS, 57º FG, 12º AF, Córcega, verano de 1944

    E) P-47D-28-RA, s/n 42-29091, volado por el Teniente Ralph Barnes, 310º FS, 58º FG, 5º AF, Aeródromo de Machinato, Okinawa, 1945

  • L-29 Delfin 1/72

    Sold out

    ED7096

    16,50
    ENGLISH

    Brand: Eduard
    Title: L-29 Delfín Profipack Edition
    Number: 7096
    Scale: 1:72

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Marca: Eduard
    Título: L-29 Delfín Profipack Edition
    Número: 7096
    Escala: 1:72

  • Avia B.534 IV. 1/144

    ED4453

    9,50
    ENGLISH

    Scale 1/144

    ESPAÑOL

    Escala 1/144

  • Bf 108 1/32

    ED3404

    27,95
    ENGLISH

    Brand: Eduard
    Title: Bf 108
    Number: 3404
    Scale: 1:32
    Type: Complete Kit

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Marca: Eduard
    Título: Bf 108
    Número: 3404
    Escala: 1:32
    Tipo: Kit completo

  • WILDE SAU: Episode one Ring of Fire Limited edition 1/48

    ED11140

    51,50
    ENGLISH

    Limited edition kit of German WWII aircraft Bf 109G-5/6 in 1/48 scale.

    Focused on machines from JG 300, JG 301 and JG 302.

    • plastic parts: Eduard
    • marking options: 10
    • decals: Eduard
    • PE parts: yes, pre-painted
    • painting mask: yes
    • resin parts: yes, wheels and “Eberspächer” acoustic pipe
    • metal pin with the Wilde Sau emblem (13 x 15 mm)

     

    Marking options:

     

    A) Bf 109G-6/R6, flown by Lt. Gerhard Pilz, 1./JG 300, Bonn-Hangelar, Germany, Autumn 1943

    In the fall of 1943, I. Gruppe JG 300 began to undertake night missions intercepting attacking bombers. Their duties were to be carried out without the use of radar, the pilots relying only on their vision, their ability to spot the bombers against the backdrop of the sky or against the blazing targets already hit, against the detonations of flak or with the aid of searchlights. For this reason, the pilots for the unit were carefully selected on the basis of their blind flying experience, often utilising former Lufthansa pilots and pilots who had already accumulated night time raid experience. The camouflage scheme of this aircraft is composed of RLM 76 on the upper and side surfaces, with irregular application of RLM 74 or RLM 75. The lower surfaces, including the drop tanks, are sprayed RLM 22 Black. The JG 300 unit emblem is carried on the nose of the aircraft.

     

    B) Bf 109G-6/R6, flown by Fw. Horst John, 3./JG 300, Bonn-Hangelar, Germany, September 1943

    Some aircraft serving with JG 300 were equipped with a system from Eberspächer. This was essentially an acoustic pipe that was installed in the location of the first exhaust stub on both sides of the engine. The system gave off a tone that could be heard on the ground. It was intended to alert Flak crews to the presence of friendly aircraft and to prevent friendly fire instances. One so-equipped aircraft was Yellow ’12’ which was flown by Fw. Horst John with the 3. Staffel. While with JG 300, he claimed seven kills, and he was himself shot down on the night of November 18/19, 1943. The standard camouflage of his aircraft was darkened through the application of a squiggle pattern of RLM 22, 70, 74 and 75. The lower surfaces were oversprayed with RLM 22 Black. The national markings and the JG 300 identifiers were likewise oversprayed.

     

    C) Bf 109G-6/R6, flown by Oblt. Gerhard Stamp, CO of 8./JG 300, Oldenburg, Germany, September – October 1943

    A holder of the Knight’s Cross, received for his successful service while with LG 1 in the fight for the Mediterranean, Oblt. Gerhard Stamp, flew with 8./JG 300 with this Bf 109G-6. The aircraft is interesting in its camouflage scheme, from which the previous owner can be ascertained. This was JG 11, as indicated by the horizontal yellow bar and the III. Gruppe marking under the cockpit. The lower surfaces and the national insignia were oversprayed with RLM 22 Black. Oblt. Stamp had his Knight’s Cross award represented on the rudder of his airplane, as well as his biggest victories (a commercial vessel of some 35,000 BRT displacement, another larger commercial vessel, as well as the British destroyer ‘Defender’). A white bar with a British national marking denoted the downing of a Lancaster on the night of September 23rd, 1943. The nose of the aircraft carries a clasp dedicated to bomber crews.

     

    D) Bf 109G-6/R6, flown by Ofw. Arnold Döring, 2./JG 300, Bonn-Hangelar, Germany, October – November 1943

    Arnold Döring was a native of Heilsberg in Eastern Prussia (today Lidzbark Warminski in Poland) and he joined the Luftwaffe in 1938. After the completion of his pilot training, he was assigned to the bomber unit KG 53, and in the summer of 1942, he was transferred to KG 55, operating on the Eastern Front. In the summer of 1943, he was reassigned to JG 300, first to the 2. Staffel, and from March 1944, to the 7. Staffel. Over the span of his service with JG 300, he downed eight enemy aircraft (five at night, three during daylight). In May 1944, Döring was transferred to NJG 2. On April 17th, 1945, he was awarded the Knight’s Cross. After the war, he worked at the Deutsche Post, and on July 1st, 1957, he joined the newly reformed Bundesluftwaffe. He retired on March 31st, 1972. The lower surfaces of this aircraft built at Erla in Leipzig, were oversprayed in RLM 22 Black, and the same colour was used to overspray the national markings on the fuselage and on the wings. The JG 300 unit emblem is carried on the nose.

     

    E) Bf 109G-5/R6, 3./JG 300, Bad Wörishofen, Germany, Summer 1944

    The Bf 109G-5 was built at Erla, and so they were always equipped with the small fairing on the right side of the engine cowl below the fuselage gun covers. The difference from this version and the Bf 109G-6 is the pressurized cockpit, with which all Bf 109G-5s were equipped. This Bf 109G-5 is camouflaged in the same manner as the example on Page 11. Judging by the yellow aircraft number, this airplane served with the 3. Staffel, and the red fuselage band ahead of the tail surfaces was applied to JG 300 aircraft serving with the Defence of the Reich. The Staffel colour was also applied to the spinner. This was sometimes applied as a strip, or, as in the case of this example, the entire forward portion of the spinner.

     

    F) Bf 109G-6/R6, flown by Oblt. Alexander Graf Rességuier de Miremont, 10./JG 301, Targsorul-Nord (Ploesti), Romania, March – April 1944

    The 10. Staffel JG 301 was sent to Romania at the beginning of 1944, tasked with the protection of the oil fields and refineries there, flying from the base at Targsorul–Nord. During the transfer to this area, the aircraft of this unit received the basic identifying features of those serving on the Eastern Front, yellow wing tips and a yellow fuselage band behind the fuselage cross. For better concealment, the fuselage was sprayed with RLM 76. A modified wilde Sau marking was applied to 10./JG 301 aircraft, a wild boar with a moon motif.

     

    G) Bf 109G-6/R6, W. Nr. 412951, flown by Lt. Horst Prenzel, 1./JG 301, Gardelegen, Germany, July 1944

    The dispatching of I. Gruppe JG 301 on the night of July 20nd/21st, 1944, over the invasion beaches meant the loss of two aircraft. As it turned out, Lt. Horst Prenzel, 1. Staffel CO and Fw. Manfred Gromill from the 3. Staffel as well, landed at Manston instead of their home field. As such, Lt. Prenzel delivered an undamaged aircraft to the enemy, while Fw. Gromill veered off the landing strip and damaged the landing gear and bottom surface of his plane. Neither pilot intended to captivity, and both through unrelated events to each other lost their bearings and mistook Manston as a field in occupied territory. The British used Prenzel’s aircraft for testing at Farnborough. The aircraft was written off after suffering damage during a flight on November 23rd, 1944. White ’16’, in a standard camouflage scheme applied at Erla in Leipzig, carried cannons in underwing gondolas, and the right one was sprayed in black.

     

    H) Bf 109G-6/R6, 2./JG 302, Helsinki, Finland, February 1944

    Through February 1944, Soviet bombers conducted three night raids against Helsinki. The German Luftwaffe provided support for the Finns in the shape of twelve Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6/R6s from I. Gruppe JG 302 that landed on Finnish territory on February 12th. During the following two Soviet raids on the Finnish capital, six of the bombers were brought down. The unit returned to Germany on May 15th, 1944. The standard day camouflage of these machines was supplemented on the top and side surfaces with the addition of a snake pattern in white after arriving in Finland. The lower surface of the right wing was oversprayed in RLM 22 Black. An interesting feature of this aircraft was the application of black on the gondola under the left wing.

     

    I) Bf 109G-6, flown by Fw. Fritz Gniffke, 6./JG 302, Ludwigslust, Germany, April 1944

    Fritz Gniffke was a native of Gdansk and from his training days, had experience in blind flying. For this reason, he was assigned to wilde Sau pilot training in Altenburg in August 1943. After its completion, he was assigned to 6. Staffel JG 302. From April 1944, the duties of JG 300, 301 and 302 was expanded with the addition of day fighting where these units were not only tasked with night interceptions against raids, but also daylight intercepts of incoming enemy bomber formations. This was the reason behind the transfer of pilots with blind flying training on single-engined fighters to NJGr.10, commanded by Hptm. Müller. One pilot that this concerned was Fw. Gniffke. In April 1944, Fw Gniffke flew this aircraft, coded Yellow ‘7’. The plane carried a standard Luftwaffe day fighter camouflage scheme with a red fuselage band, the marking that identified this aircraft as belonging to JG 302 within the Defence of the Reich system. The markings on this plane included a small ‘N’ (‘N’ for Nacht), and was a reference to its use as a nightfighter.

     

    J) Bf 109G-6, 2./JG 302, Götzendorf, Germany, July 1944

    JG 302 was the final Geschwader that carried the job description of night interception of bombers using single engined day fighters and the wilde Sau tactic. It was formed on November 1st, 1943. As was the case with the two previous units, this one also utilised the services of pilots who were capable in the field of blind flying, most often hailing from bomber units or from Lufthansa. In May 1944, I. Gruppe was moved to Vienna, and by this time, the task of the unit was no longer night fighting, but had reverted back to classic day fighting. At the time, it was busy with American bomber wave and their fighter escort interception duties that were attacking industrial centres around Vienna, Budapest and Bratislava. The camouflage of Black ’11’ was composed of RLM 74/75 on the upper and side surfaces, and the bottom surfaces were sprayed in RLM 76. The camouflage scheme was rounded out by the addition of Eastern Front identifying features in the form of yellow wing tips and a red fuselage band ahead of the tail surfaces denoting JG 302 aircraft operating within the realm of the Defence of the Reich system. The nose carried the JG 302 unit insignia, a devil with a pitchfork sitting on a wild boar.

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición limitada de la aeronave alemana de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Bf 109G-5/6 a escala 1/48.

    Centrado en las máquinas de JG 300, JG 301 y JG 302.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    opciones de marcado: 10
    calcomanías: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, prepintadas
    máscara de pintura: sí
    partes de resina: sí, ruedas y tubo acústico “Eberspächer”.
    alfiler de metal con el emblema de Wilde Sau (13 x 15 mm)

     

    Opciones de marcado:

    A) Bf 109G-6/R6, volado por el Teniente Gerhard Pilz, 1./JG 300, Bonn-Hangelar, Alemania, otoño de 1943

    En el otoño de 1943, el I. Gruppe JG 300 comenzó a realizar misiones nocturnas para interceptar bombarderos atacantes. Sus tareas debían llevarse a cabo sin el uso de radares, los pilotos sólo confiaban en su visión, en su capacidad de detectar los bombarderos contra el fondo del cielo o contra los blancos ardientes ya alcanzados, contra las detonaciones de fuego antiaéreo o con la ayuda de reflectores. Por esta razón, los pilotos de la unidad se seleccionaban cuidadosamente sobre la base de su experiencia de vuelo a ciegas, utilizando a menudo antiguos pilotos de Lufthansa y pilotos que ya habían acumulado experiencia en incursiones nocturnas. El esquema de camuflaje de esta aeronave está compuesto por el RLM 76 en las superficies superior y lateral, con una aplicación irregular del RLM 74 o del RLM 75. Las superficies inferiores, incluyendo los tanques de caída, son rociadas con RLM 22 Black. El emblema de la unidad JG 300 se lleva en el morro de la aeronave.

    B) Bf 109G-6/R6, volado por Fw. Horst John, 3./JG 300, Bonn-Hangelar, Alemania, septiembre de 1943

    Algunos aviones que sirven con el JG 300 fueron equipados con un sistema de Eberspächer. Este era esencialmente un tubo acústico que se instaló en la ubicación del primer tubo de escape a ambos lados del motor. El sistema emitía un tono que se podía escuchar en tierra. Su objetivo era alertar a las tripulaciones de Flak de la presencia de aviones amigos y prevenir los casos de fuego amigo. Un avión tan equipado era el Yellow ’12’ que volaba con Fw. Horst John con el 3. Staffel. Mientras estaba con el JG 300, se cobró siete vidas, y él mismo fue abatido en la noche del 18/19 de noviembre de 1943. El camuflaje estándar de su avión fue oscurecido mediante la aplicación de un patrón de garabatos de RLM 22, 70, 74 y 75. Las superficies inferiores fueron rociadas con RLM 22 Black. Las marcas nacionales y los identificadores del JG 300 también fueron rociados en exceso.

    C) Bf 109G-6/R6, volado por Oblt. Gerhard Stamp, CO de 8./JG 300, Oldenburg, Alemania, septiembre – octubre de 1943

    Un poseedor de la Cruz de Caballero, recibido por su exitoso servicio mientras estaba con LG 1 en la lucha por el Mediterráneo, Oblt. Gerhard Stamp, voló con 8./JG 300 con este Bf 109G-6. El avión es interesante por su esquema de camuflaje, del que se puede averiguar el anterior propietario. Este era el JG 11, como indica la barra amarilla horizontal y el III. Marca de grupo bajo la cabina de mando. Las superficies inferiores y la insignia nacional fueron rociadas con RLM 22 Negro. Oblato. Stamp tenía su premio de la Cruz de Caballero representado en el timón de su avión, así como sus mayores victorias (un buque comercial de unos 35.000 BRT de desplazamiento, otro buque comercial más grande, así como el destructor británico ‘Defender’). Una barra blanca con una marca nacional británica indicaba el derribo de un Lancaster en la noche del 23 de septiembre de 1943. El morro del avión lleva un cierre dedicado a las tripulaciones de los bombarderos.

    D) Bf 109G-6/R6, volado por Ofw. Arnold Döring, 2./JG 300, Bonn-Hangelar, Alemania, octubre – noviembre de 1943

    Arnold Döring era oriundo de Heilsberg en Prusia Oriental (hoy Lidzbark Warminski en Polonia) y se incorporó a la Luftwaffe en 1938. Después de completar su entrenamiento como piloto, fue asignado a la unidad de bombarderos KG 53, y en el verano de 1942, fue transferido al KG 55, operando en el Frente Oriental. En el verano de 1943, fue reasignado al JG 300, primero al 2. Staffel, y desde marzo de 1944, al 7. Staffel. Durante su servicio en el JG 300, derribó ocho aviones enemigos (cinco de noche, tres de día). En mayo de 1944, Döring fue transferido al NJG 2. El 17 de abril de 1945, se le concedió la Cruz de Caballero. Después de la guerra, trabajó en el Deutsche Post, y el 1 de julio de 1957, se unió a la recién reformada Bundesluftwaffe. Se retiró el 31 de marzo de 1972. Las superficies inferiores de este avión construido en Erla en Leipzig, fueron rociadas con RLM 22 Negro, y el mismo color fue utilizado para rociar las marcas nacionales en el fuselaje y en las alas. El emblema de la unidad JG 300 se lleva en la nariz.

    E) Bf 109G-5/R6, 3./JG 300, Bad Wörishofen, Alemania, verano de 1944

    El Bf 109G-5 se construyó en Erla, y por eso siempre estaban equipados con el pequeño carenado en el lado derecho de la cubierta del motor debajo de las tapas del fuselaje. La diferencia con esta versión y el Bf 109G-6 es la cabina presurizada, con la que todos los Bf 109G-5 estaban equipados. Este Bf 109G-5 está camuflado de la misma manera que el ejemplo de la página 11. A juzgar por el número de avión amarillo, este avión servía con el 3. Staffel, y la banda roja del fuselaje delante de las superficies de la cola se aplicaba

    El Bf 109G-5 se construyó en Erla, y por eso siempre estaban equipados con el pequeño carenado en el lado derecho de la cubierta del motor debajo de las tapas del fuselaje. La diferencia con esta versión y el Bf 109G-6 es la cabina presurizada, con la que todos los Bf 109G-5 estaban equipados. Este Bf 109G-5 está camuflado de la misma manera que el ejemplo de la página 11. A juzgar por el número de avión amarillo, este avión sirvió con el 3. Staffel, y la banda roja del fuselaje delante de las superficies de la cola se aplicó al avión JG 300 que servía en la Defensa del Reich. El color de Staffel también se aplicó al spinner. A veces se aplicaba como una banda, o, como en este ejemplo, toda la parte delantera del spinner.
    F) Bf 109G-6/R6, volado por Oblt. Alexander Graf Rességuier de Miremont, 10./JG 301, Targsorul-Nord (Ploesti), Rumania, marzo – abril de 1944

    El 10. Staffel JG 301 fue enviado a Rumania a principios de 1944, con la tarea de proteger los campos de petróleo y las refinerías de allí, volando desde la base de Targsorul-Nord. Durante el traslado a esta zona, los aviones de esta unidad recibieron los rasgos identificativos básicos de los que servían en el Frente Oriental, puntas de ala amarillas y una banda de fuselaje amarilla detrás de la cruz del fuselaje. Para una mejor ocultación, el fuselaje fue rociado con RLM 76. Se aplicó una marca Wilde Sau modificada a la aeronave 10./JG 301, un jabalí con un motivo lunar.

    G) Bf 109G-6/R6, W. Nr. 412951, pilotado por el Teniente Horst Prenzel, 1./JG 301, Gardelegen, Alemania, julio de 1944

    El envío del I. Gruppe JG 301 en la noche del 20/21 de julio de 1944, sobre las playas de la invasión significó la pérdida de dos aviones. Resultó que el Teniente Horst Prenzel, 1. Staffel CO y Fw. Manfred Gromill del 3. Staffel también, aterrizaron en Manston en lugar de su campo de origen. Como tal, el Tte. Prenzel entregó un avión intacto al enemigo, mientras que el Fw. Gromill se desvió de la pista de aterrizaje y dañó el tren de aterrizaje y la superficie inferior de su avión. Ninguno de los dos pilotos tenía la intención de cautivarse, y ambos, por sucesos no relacionados entre sí, perdieron el rumbo y confundieron a Manston con un campo en territorio ocupado. Los británicos utilizaron el avión de Prenzel para hacer pruebas en Farnborough. El avión se dio por perdido después de sufrir daños durante un vuelo el 23 de noviembre de 1944. El blanco ’16’, en un esquema de camuflaje estándar aplicado en Erla en Leipzig, llevaba los cañones en góndolas de ala, y el derecho fue rociado en negro.

    H) Bf 109G-6/R6, 2./JG 302, Helsinki, Finlandia, febrero de 1944

    Hasta febrero de 1944, los bombarderos soviéticos realizaron tres incursiones nocturnas contra Helsinki. La Luftwaffe alemana apoyó a los finlandeses con doce Messerschmitt Bf 109G-6/R6 del I. Gruppe JG 302 que aterrizaron en territorio finlandés el 12 de febrero. Durante las dos siguientes incursiones soviéticas en la capital finlandesa, seis de los bombarderos fueron derribados. La unidad regresó a Alemania el 15 de mayo de 1944. El camuflaje diurno estándar de estas máquinas se completó en las superficies superior y lateral con la adición de un patrón de serpiente en blanco después de llegar a Finlandia. La superficie inferior del ala derecha fue rociada con RLM 22 Negro. Una característica interesante de este avión fue la aplicación de negro en la góndola bajo el ala izquierda.

    I) Bf 109G-6, volado por Fw. Fritz Gniffke, 6./JG 302, Ludwigslust, Alemania, abril de 1944

    Fritz Gniffke era nativo de Gdansk y desde sus días de entrenamiento, tenía experiencia en el vuelo a ciegas. Por esta razón, fue asignado al entrenamiento de piloto de Wilde Sau en Altenburg en agosto de 1943. Después de su finalización, fue asignado al 6. Staffel JG 302. A partir de abril de 1944, las tareas de los JG 300, 301 y 302 se ampliaron con la adición de los combates diurnos, en los que estas unidades no sólo se encargaban de las interceptaciones nocturnas contra los ataques, sino también de las interceptaciones diurnas de las formaciones de bombarderos enemigos que se acercaban. Esta fue la razón del traslado de pilotos con entrenamiento de vuelo a ciegas en cazas monomotores al NJGr.10, comandado por el Hptm. Müller. Uno de los pilotos a los que esto concernía era Fw. Gniffke. En abril de 1944, Fw Gniffke voló este avión, codificado como Amarillo ‘7’. El avión llevaba un camuflaje estándar de la Luftwaffe con una banda roja en el fuselaje, la marca que identificaba a este avión como perteneciente al JG 302 dentro del sistema de Defensa del Reich. Las marcas de este avión incluían una pequeña ‘N’ (‘N’ de Nacht), y era una referencia a su uso como caza nocturno.

    J) Bf 109G-6, 2./JG 302, Götzendorf, Alemania, julio de 1944

    JG 302 fue el último Geschwader que llevó la descripción del trabajo de interceptación nocturna de bombarderos usando cazas diurnos de un solo motor y la táctica de Wilde Sau. Se formó el 1 de noviembre de 1943. Al igual que las dos unidades anteriores, ésta también utilizó los servicios de pilotos capaces de volar a ciegas, la mayoría de las veces procedentes de unidades de bombarderos o de Lufthansa. En mayo de 1944, el I. Gruppe se trasladó a Viena, y para entonces, la tarea de la unidad ya no era la lucha nocturna, sino que había vuelto a la lucha diurna clásica.

  • Morane Saulnier Type N 1/48

    ED8095

    14,95
    ENGLISH

    ProfiPACK edition kit of French WWI fighter aircraft Morane Saulnier Type N in 1/48 scale.

    French and British markings.

    • plastic parts: Eduard
    • marking options: 6
    • decals: Eduard
    • PE parts: yes, pre-painted
    • painting mask: yes
    • resin parts: no

    Marking options:

    A) MS398, flown by Adj. Jean Marie Dominique Navarre, Escadrille MS 12, France, October 1915

    Jean Navarre, a future ace with twelve confirmed air victories flying the Morane Saulnier Type N MS398, came upon a German LVG C II over Chateau-Thierry on October 26th, 1915. The German gunner fired off some 300 rounds with no effect in the combat that ensued. Navarre required a mere eight rounds before damaging the engine of the German reconnaissance aircraft. After the latter set down in French territory, Navarre landed next to it, and the event gave rise to a photo op. The Germans congratulated Navarre on his victory, and were taken prisoner. Not long thereafter, Navarre was transferred to Escadrille N 67, equipped with the Nieuport aircraft. S/Lt. Navarre suffered serious head injuries on June 17th, 1916 in combat, and this cut short his combat career. He died on July 10th, 1919, while practising for a parade fly-by, which was to have taken place on July 14th of the same year.

    B) MS394, probably from Escadrille MS.12, France, 1915

    Escadrille 12 was formed in 1912, and is known for its use of Nieuport aircraft over the course of the First World War. The unit utilized these aircraft from the start of the war, and, according to French Air Force protocols, was designated N 12 (‘N’ for Nieuport). On February 28th, 1915, it re-equipped with the Morane Saulnier Type N, and the unit’s designation followed suite, being changed to MS 12. These aircraft were not particularly liked, and the pilots gladly traded them in for Nieuport 11s in September 1915. The unit designation reverted to N 12. Initially, the Morane Saulnier Type N flew with the front of the aircraft in black. The same can be said of aircraft that were coming out of licensed production at Pfalz, and for this reason, the Morane aircraft were repainted red.

    C) flown by Sergt. Jean Chaput, Escadrille N 31, France, 1916

    A native of Paris, Jean Chaput joined the army in 1913 at the age of twenty. At first, he served as a infantryman and to the Air Force transferred in 1914. Initially, he flew with Escadrille 28, where he would attain his first kill, when he forced down a Fokker Eindecker on June 12th, 1915. He was wounded three days later, and after recuperating, he returned to active duty in January 1916, this time with Escadrille N 31, armed with a mix of Nieuport and Morane Saulnier aircraft. Over the course of the war, he would be seriously wounded several more times and he claimed a total of sixteen victories. His life ended in May 1918, while in the cockpit of a SPAD XIII, was shot down by Hermann Becker of Jasta 12, near Montdidier.

    D) A.122, flown by Lt. Simpson, No. 60 Squadron RFC, Boisdinghem, France, June 1916

    The British, due to a shortage of their own aircraft, expressed an interest in the Morane Saulnier Type N, of which the French side ended up supplying 27. The British called the Bullet. This aircraft was assigned to the Royal Flying Corps on April 24th, 1916, and on the 19th of May of the same year, it made its way to No. 60 Squadron. On June 3rd, Lt. Simpson took off for gunnery practice, and an engine failure immediately after take-off brought about the writing off of this aircraft after only 4.5 hours in the air. Morane Saulnier Type Ns, serving with No. 60 Squadron at this time, carried a red band on the fuselage. From photographs of this specific airplane, though, it is not clear if the band was carried, and so both possibilities are being offered.

    E) A.173, flown by 2/Lt. Beauchamp N. Wainwright, No. 60 Squadron RFC, France, August 1916

    This aircraft originally served with the French Air Force, but due to British interest in the type, it was transferred on May 30th, 1916, and subsequently assigned to No. 60 Squadron. On August 28th, 1916, it was being flown by 2/Lt. Wainwright, along with two colleagues of his, as a bomber escort for the No. 8 Squadron. Wainwright was last seen attacking German LVG aircraft. On his eventual release, he reported that during his attack, he was hit in the engine, and had to make an emergency landing behind German lines between Baupame and Peronne, where he was taken into captivity.

    F) A.178, flown by Lt. Tone H. P. Bayetto, No. 24 Squadron RFC, France, June 1916

    As with the preceding aircraft, this example served with the French Air Force, and was transferred to the British RFC at the beginning of June 1916, assigned to No. 3 Squadron. In July 1916, when the Battle for the Somme was in its beginning phases, it was lent to No. 24 Squadron, where it was flown by Lt. Tone Hippolyte Paul Bayetto. After it was returned to No. 3 Squadron, it made its way to No. 60 Squadron, and in September it was disassembled and was shipped to Great Britain.

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición ProfiPACK del avión de combate francés de la Primera Guerra Mundial Morane Saulnier Tipo N en escala 1/48.

    Marcas francesas y británicas.

    • piezas de plástico: Eduard
    • opciones de marcado: 6
    • calcas: Eduard
    • Piezas de PE: sí, prepintadas
    • máscara de pintura: sí
    • partes de resina: no

     

    Opciones de marcado:

    A) MS398, volado por el Adj. Jean Marie Dominique Navarre, Escuadrilla MS 12, Francia, octubre de 1915

    Jean Navarre, un futuro as con doce victorias aéreas confirmadas volando con el Morane Saulnier Tipo N MS398, se encontró con un LVG C II alemán sobre Chateau-Thierry el 26 de octubre de 1915. El artillero alemán disparó unos 300 cartuchos sin efecto en el combate que se produjo. Navarra sólo necesitó ocho disparos antes de dañar el motor del avión de reconocimiento alemán. Después de que éste se posara en territorio francés, Navarra aterrizó junto a él, y el hecho dio lugar a una operación fotográfica. Los alemanes felicitaron a Navarra por su victoria y fueron hechos prisioneros. Poco después, Navarra fue transferida a la Escuadrilla N 67, equipada con el avión Nieuport. El 17 de junio de 1916, el Teniente Coronel Navarre sufrió graves heridas en la cabeza durante el combate, lo que interrumpió su carrera de combate. Murió el 10 de julio de 1919, mientras practicaba para un desfile aéreo, que debía tener lugar el 14 de julio del mismo año.

    B) MS394, probablemente de la Escuadrilla MS.12, Francia, 1915

    La Escuadrilla 12 se formó en 1912, y es conocida por su uso de aviones Nieuport durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. La unidad utilizó estos aviones desde el comienzo de la guerra, y, según los protocolos de la Fuerza Aérea Francesa, fue designada N 12 (‘N’ de Nieuport). El 28 de febrero de 1915, se reequipó con el Morane Saulnier Tipo N, y la designación de la unidad siguió a la suite, siendo cambiada a MS 12. Estos aviones no eran muy apreciados, y los pilotos los cambiaron gustosamente por los Nieuport 11 en septiembre de 1915. La designación de la unidad volvió a ser N 12. Inicialmente, el Morane Saulnier Tipo N volaba con la parte delantera del avión en negro. Lo mismo puede decirse de los aviones que salían de la producción bajo licencia en Pfalz, y por esta razón, los aviones Morane fueron repintados de rojo.

    C) volado por el Sargento. Jean Chaput, Escuadrilla N 31, Francia, 1916

    Nacido en París, Jean Chaput se unió al ejército en 1913 a la edad de 20 años. Al principio, sirvió como soldado de infantería y en la Fuerza Aérea fue transferido en 1914. Inicialmente, voló con la Escuadrilla 28, donde lograría su primera muerte, cuando forzó un Fokker Eindecker el 12 de junio de 1915. Fue herido tres días después, y después de recuperarse, volvió al servicio activo en enero de 1916, esta vez con el Escadrille N 31, armado con una mezcla de aviones Nieuport y Morane Saulnier. En el curso de la guerra, sería gravemente herido varias veces más y obtuvo un total de dieciséis victorias. Su vida terminó en mayo de 1918, mientras que en la cabina de un SPAD XIII, fue derribado por Hermann Becker de Jasta 12, cerca de Montdidier.

    D) A.122, volado por el Teniente Simpson, Escuadrón No. 60 RFC, Boisdinghem, Francia, junio de 1916

    Los británicos, debido a la escasez de sus propios aviones, expresaron su interés en el Morane Saulnier Tipo N, del cual el lado francés terminó suministrando 27. Los británicos llamaron al Bullet. Esta aeronave fue asignada al Cuerpo de Vuelo Real el 24 de abril de 1916, y el 19 de mayo del mismo año, se dirigió al Escuadrón No. 60. El 3 de junio, el teniente Simpson despegó para practicar tiro al blanco, y un fallo de motor inmediatamente después del despegue provocó la anulación de este avión después de sólo 4 horas y media en el aire. El Morane Saulnier Tipo N, que servía en el Escuadrón No. 60 en ese momento, llevaba una banda roja en el fuselaje. De las fotografías de este avión en particular, sin embargo, no está claro si la banda fue llevada, por lo que se ofrecen ambas posibilidades.

    E) A.173, volado por el 2/Lt. Beauchamp N. Wainwright, Escuadrón No. 60 RFC, Francia, agosto de 1916

    Esta aeronave sirvió originalmente en la Fuerza Aérea Francesa, pero debido al interés británico en el tipo, fue transferida el 30 de mayo de 1916 y posteriormente asignada al Escuadrón No. 60. El 28 de agosto de 1916, fue volado por el Teniente Wainwright, junto con dos colegas suyos, como bombardero de escolta para el Escuadrón No. 8. Wainwright fue visto por última vez atacando aviones alemanes LVG. Al ser liberado, informó que durante su ataque, fue alcanzado en el motor, y tuvo que hacer un aterrizaje de emergencia detrás de las líneas alemanas entre Baupame y Peronne, donde fue llevado en cautiverio.

    F) A.178, volado por el Teniente Tone H. P. Bayetto, Escuadrón RFC No. 24, Francia, junio de 1916

    Al igual que la aeronave anterior, este ejemplo sirvió en la Fuerza Aérea Francesa, y fue transferido a la RFC británica a principios de junio de 1916, asignado al Escuadrón No. 3. En julio de 1916, cuando la Batalla del Somme estaba en sus fases iniciales, se prestó al Escuadrón Nº 24, donde fue pilotado por el Teniente Tone Hippolyte Paul Bayetto. Después de ser devuelto al escuadrón 3, se dirigió al escuadrón 60, y en septiembre fue desmontado y enviado a Gre

  • F6F-3 1/48

    ED84160

    16,50
    ENGLISH

    Weekend edition kit of US WWII fighter aircraft F6F-3 in 1/48 scale.

    • plastic parts: Eduard
    • marking options: 2
    • decals: Eduard
    • PE parts: no
    • painting mask:no

    Marking options:

    A) VF-27, USS Princeton, October 1944

    The most striking markings applied to the Hellcat were applied to the aircraft of VF-27 on the USS Princeton (CVL-23). The sharkmouth and bloodshot eyes seared themselves into the memory of more than one Japanese pilot. The sharkmouth and eyes were applied to all the Hellcats serving with VF-27 by one of its pilots, Robert Burnell, and with them, wreaked havoc everywhere they operated in the Pacific. Over this span, they accounted for some two hundred downed enemy aircraft. The end of combat for VF-27 came about on October 24th, 1944, when the Princeton suffered a Japanese bomb hit. A major fire ensued, and the Princeton was finally sunk using torpedoes launched from friendly ships. Only a few aircraft that were in the air at the time landed on the USS Essex. One of them was this Hellcat, with the uncommon ‘F11’ marking and with two kill marks in the form of small Japanese flags below the cockpit.

    B) flown by Lt. Arthur Singer, VF-15, USS Essex, B October 24th – 25th, 1944

    USS Essex (CV-9) participated with Task Force 58 in the Battle of Leyte Gulf that took place on October 24 – 25, 1944 in the Philippines. VF-15 Hellcats were launched from Essex as part of the second wave of U.S. aircraft that attacked the Japanese battleship Musashi and helped to sink her on October 24th. Arthur Singer, Jr. achieved ace status on September 12th, 1944, downing a J2M Jack fighter over Cebu. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for his extraordinary achievements while participating in aerial combat on October 25th, 1944. Singer´s final tally was ten victories.

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición de fin de semana del avión de combate F6F-3 de la Segunda Guerra Mundial en escala 1/48.

    • piezas de plástico: Eduard
    • opciones de marcado: 2
    • calcas: Eduard
    • Partes de PE: no
    • máscara de pintura: no

     

    Opciones de marcado:

    A) VF-27, USS Princeton, octubre de 1944

    Las marcas más llamativas aplicadas al Hellcat se aplicaron a la aeronave de VF-27 en el USS Princeton (CVL-23). La boca de tiburón y los ojos inyectados en sangre se grabaron en la memoria de más de un piloto japonés. La boca de tiburón y los ojos inyectados en sangre fueron aplicados a todos los Hellcats que servían con el VF-27 por uno de sus pilotos, Robert Burnell, y con ellos, causaron estragos en todos los lugares del Pacífico donde operaban. Durante este período, fueron responsables de unos doscientos aviones enemigos derribados. El fin del combate del VF-27 se produjo el 24 de octubre de 1944, cuando el Princeton sufrió el impacto de una bomba japonesa. Se produjo un gran incendio, y el Princeton fue finalmente hundido usando torpedos lanzados desde barcos amigos. Sólo unos pocos aviones que estaban en el aire en ese momento aterrizaron en el USS Essex. Uno de ellos era este Hellcat, con la poco común marca “F11” y con dos marcas de muerte en forma de pequeñas banderas japonesas debajo de la cabina.

    B) Volado por el Teniente Arthur Singer, VF-15, USS Essex, B Octubre 24 – 25, 1944

    El USS Essex (CV-9) participó con el Grupo de Tareas 58 en la Batalla del Golfo de Leyte que tuvo lugar los días 24 y 25 de octubre de 1944 en Filipinas. Los VF-15 Hellcats fueron lanzados desde el Essex como parte de la segunda oleada de aviones estadounidenses que atacaron al acorazado japonés Musashi y ayudaron a hundirlo el 24 de octubre. Arthur Singer, Jr. alcanzó la categoría de as el 12 de septiembre de 1944, derribando un caza J2M Jack sobre Cebú. Fue premiado con la Cruz Voladora Distinguida por sus extraordinarios logros mientras participaba en el combate aéreo el 25 de octubre de 1944. El recuento final de Singer fue de diez victorias.

  • Allied Airfield with PSP cover 300×400 1/48

    ED8804

    4,95
    ENGLISH

    Dimensions:

    Width: 395mm
    Length: 297mm
    Depth: 10mm

    Scale: 1/48
    Product: Plastic kit
    Type: PSP
    Manufacturer: Eduard

    ESPAÑOL

    Dimensiones:

    Ancho: 395 mm
    Longitud: 297 mm
    Profundidad: 10 mm

    Escala: 1/48
    Producto: kit de plastico
    Tipo: PSP
    Fabricante: Eduard

  • Tempest Mk.V Series 1 1/48

    ED84171

    21,95
    ENGLISH

    Weekend edition kit of British WWII fighter aircraft Tempest Mk.V Series 1 in 1/48 scale.

    Fokused on machines participated in the Operation Overlord.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    marking options: 2
    decals: Eduard,
    PE parts: no,
    painting mask: no
    Marking options:
    A) JN751, W/Cdr Roland P. Beamont DSO, DFC & bar, CO of No. 150 Wing, Newchurch, United Kingdom, June 1944
    In May 1944, No. 150 Wing was deemed operational. The Tempest equipped only No. 3 and No. 486 Squadrons, while No. 56 Squadron had to wait for their new Tempests until late June 1944 and used the Spitfire Mk.IX in the interim. The task of the Tempests of No. 150 Wing at the time of the invasion was to provide air cover over the battlefield and attack enemy ground targets but from mid-June, the priority became (as the Tempest was the most suitable aircraft for the task) the protection of southern England from V-1 attacks. At the end of September 1944, the entire unit under the leadership of Beamont moved to liberated Europe. On October 12th, Beamont´s machine was hit by flak and due to a damaged radiator had to put down behind enemy lines and spent the remainder of the war in captivity. Over the course of the Second World War, Beamont claimed nine kills and in July 1944 was awarded a bar to his DSO in recognition of his successful leadership of the Tempest wing which had destroyed more than 600 V-1s (32 by Beamont himself). After the war, he continued on as a test pilot and flew, among others, the Meteor, Vampire, Canberra, Lighting and the TSR-2. He retired in August 1979 and died on November 19th, 2001. Two days before the invasion of Europe, Beamont’s aircraft received the prescribed ’Special Markings’ – 18-inch wide black and white stripes encircling the rear fuselage and wings.

    B) JN765, No. 3 Squadron, Newchurch, United Kingdom, June 1944
    No. 3 Squadron was formed in 1912 and at the beginning of the Second World War was equipped with the Hawker Hurricane. As a component of the British Expeditionary Force it fought over Belgium and France. On returning to Great Britain, patrol duties were assigned to the unit over the Royal Navy base at Scape Flow and from April 1941, operated over southern England as a night fighter unit. In February 1943, the unit was re-equipped with the Hawker Typhoon and a year later, the Tempest. With these aircraft, the unit prepared for the invasion of Europe but was held back to defend southern England against the V-1 flying bomb. When the V-1 launch sites were over-run, it was one of the Tempest squadrons transferred to the European mainland to support advancing Allied troops all the way to the end of the war. It remained in Germany until May 1999 as part of the British Air Forces of Occupation (BAFO), 2nd TAF and RAF Germany. At the turn of the century, the unit took part in the bombings of Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Iraq, and in 2004, Afghanistan. In March 2006, the unit received the Eurofighter Typhoon. In early June 1944, No. 3 Squadron’s code was changed from QO to JF which was used until August 1945. The socalled ‘Invasion Stripes’ were also added to aircraft serialed JN765 prior to the operation. Groundcrew painted black the bottom section of the main landing gear cover black, apparently in error.

    Intro:
    The story of the Tempest is nothing more than an attempt to address the shortcomings of Hawker Typhoon, which prevented it from being a successful fighter. The main problem of the Typhoon was the thick wing with NACA 22 profile, offering lot of inner space for fuel and armament, but building drag rapidly with rising speed. Not surprisingly was the wing at the core of the changes on the way to the new fighter. The resulting design was originally supposed to retain the Typhoon name as the Mark II, but it became obvious, the result would be a new plane, so the name was changed to the Tempest, following the traditional path of Hawker to use the “wind” names for its fighters.

    Series of changes
    The new wing was 5 in (12,7 cm) thinner at the root and also the planform changed in comparison with Typhoon wing to more elliptical shape. As the new wing did not offer enough space for fuel, additional 76 gal (288 l) fuel tank had to be installed in the fuselage. The space for it was found between the firewall and the oil tank, but, consequently, it was necessary to move the engine forward by 21 in (53,4 cm). Due to that, the tail surfaces, both the stabilizer as well as elevator, had to be enlarged, also the undercarriage was rebuilt. So, yes, it was a new plane, although it kept the Typhoon engine, which was a very complex issue by itself. With quite ambitious goals regarding the performance of Tempest, new units were considered instead of troubled Napier Sabre II powering the Typhoon. But the things went different way…

    Back to the roots
    Early contract was placed for two prototypes based on the Typhoon airframes powered by Sabre IV, but due to delays, only the HM599 was fitted with it, while HM595 used old Sabre II. The two prototypes also differed in radiator layout as the HM595 retained the distinctive chin radiator of Typhoon, while HM599 undergo radical change as Sydney Camm, Hawker chief designer, wanted to streamline the design. The radiator moved to the leading edge of the inner wing sections on both sides and the sleek nose got some resemblance to the Spitfire. The wing-mounted radiators layout worked well aerodynamically, but the Sabre IV evinced multiple problems and also the complexity of the wing assembly with integrated radiators was of some concern.

    There were only two other units powerful enough for use with the Tempest instead of Sabre IV: the R&R Griffon and radial Bristol Centaurus IV. As the new name Tempest was definitely chosen, different marks were assigned to each engine variant and four more prototypes were ordered. The Mk.I was to be powered by the Sabre IV (HM599), the Mk.II by the Centaurus IV (LA602 and LA607), the Mk.III by the R&R Griffon IIB (LA610) and the Mk.IV by the Griffon 61 (LA614). Finally, the Mk.V (HM595) used slightly improved version of the Sabre II (IIB) producing 2,400 hp (1790 kW), thus 200 hp (147 kW) more than previous version. Although it was meant as a stopgap solution until Sabre IV engines would be available, it finally emerged as the main variant of the Tempest, because Centaurus was too late, Sabre Mk.IV still troubled by glitches and integration of the Griffon into the Typhoon airframe proved to be more demanding than expected. So Mk.III ended with first and only prototype, while Mk.IV was never built.

    Legend is born
    The HM595 prototype with Sabre II flew for the first time on September 2nd, 1942, fitted with car door canopy, as the bubble canopy was in development at the time. Streamlined HM599 with Sabre IV performed its maiden flight on February 24th, 1943. It was reasonably faster than HM595, but the solution of problems would take too much time. The easiest way to get the Tempest into the service was to proceed with Mk.V.

    The first production Tempest Mk.V made its maiden flight on June 21st, 1943, already fitted with bubble canopy. Armed with four 20 mm Hispano Mk.II cannon (200 rounds per barrel) achieved a top speed of 432 mph (695 km/h) at 18,400 feet (5,600 m), up to 45 mph (72 km/h) more than Bf 109 of Fw 190 (depending on mark). After the first production batch, the Hispano Mk.V cannons were installed, differentiating it from the first batch by barrels fully covered by the wing. The first squadron to receive Tempests was No. 486 in January 1944. Together with No. 3 Squadron it became operational in April 1944. With addition of No. 56 Squadron the first Tempest Wing was formed at Newchurch, Kent, under the command of W/Cdr Roland Prosper „Bee“ Beamont.

    Fighting everything
    After the period of operations over the France following the D-Day, the Tempest Wing was tasked to fight the V-1 Flying Bombs travelling low at speed of some 400 mph (640 km/h). The Tempest Mk.V was never effective high level fighter due to the nature of its engine, but at the middle and low levels was superior to virtually everything. And some 640 destroyed V-1s during the short period between June and August 1944 speak by themselves, as the rest of RAF scored some 160 of them during the period.

    After the V-1 bombing campaign ceased, the Tempest Squadrons returned to the common tasks. At the time, seven Tempest squadrons were flying air-to-air combats and claimed 240 kills (some 20 of them Me 262 jets). Most successful Tempest ace, D. C. Fairbanks (US) recorded 11 kills flying Mk.V „Terror of Rheine“. Second with nine kills came W. E. Schrader (NZ) with nine and J. J. Payton with six kills emerged as third overall. The most famous Tempest Pilot the Free French Pierre Clostermann added four kills to his tally of 11 (some sources state 18 kills, the precise number is unknown).

    Tempest was formidable fighter, fast, tough, with powerful weapons. Thanks to the excellent low altitude performance, the strafing attacks were also quite common, usually during the „search and destroy“ rides. Apart of cannons, the provision of two 1000 lb (450 kg) bombs or eight 60 lb (27 kg) rockets added to the destructive force.

    To the end of an era
    Two more variants of the Tempest would enter production later on, but both were too late to see WW II service. The Tempest Mk.II powered by the Centaurus V used some experience gained by examining the engine cowling of captured Fw 190s. The Tempest VI used the Sabre V engine, and was used only by five RAF squadrons based in the Middle East. Of the Tempest Mk.V 1,401 were produced. After the war Tempest V continued in service with British Air Force of Occupation (BAFO) squadrons until replaced by Tempest Mk.II.

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición de fin de semana del avión de combate británico de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Tempest Mk.V Series 1 en escala 1/48.

    Fokused en máquinas participó en la Operación Overlord.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    opciones de marcado: 2
    calcomanías: Eduard,
    Piezas de PE: no,
    máscara de pintura: no
    Opciones de marcado:
    A) JN751, W / Cdr Roland P. Beamont DSO, DFC & bar, CO of No. 150 Wing, Newchurch, Reino Unido, junio de 1944
    En mayo de 1944, el Ala No. 150 fue considerada operativa. La Tempestad equipaba solo los Escuadrones No. 3 y No. 486, mientras que el Escuadrón No. 56 tuvo que esperar sus nuevas Tempestad hasta fines de junio de 1944 y usó el Spitfire Mk.IX en el ínterin. La tarea de las Tempestades del Ala No. 150 en el momento de la invasión era proporcionar cobertura aérea sobre el campo de batalla y atacar objetivos terrestres enemigos, pero desde mediados de junio, la prioridad se convirtió (ya que la Tempestad era el avión más adecuado para la tarea ) la protección del sur de Inglaterra de los ataques V-1. A finales de septiembre de 1944, toda la unidad bajo el liderazgo de Beamont se trasladó a la Europa liberada. El 12 de octubre, la máquina de Beamont fue alcanzada por el fuego antiaéreo y debido a un radiador dañado tuvo que soltarse detrás de las líneas enemigas y pasó el resto de la guerra en cautiverio. En el transcurso de la Segunda Guerra Mundial, Beamont reclamó nueve asesinatos y en julio de 1944 se le otorgó una barra a su DSO en reconocimiento a su exitoso liderazgo del ala Tempestad que había destruido más de 600 V-1 (32 por el propio Beamont). Después de la guerra, continuó como piloto de pruebas y voló, entre otros, el Meteor, Vampire, Canberra, Lighting y el TSR-2. Se retiró en agosto de 1979 y murió el 19 de noviembre de 2001. Dos días antes de la invasión de Europa, el avión de Beamont recibió las “Marcas Especiales” prescritas: rayas blancas y negras de 18 pulgadas de ancho que rodeaban el fuselaje y las alas traseras.

     

    B) JN765, Escuadrón No. 3, Newchurch, Reino Unido, junio de 1944
    El Escuadrón No. 3 se formó en 1912 y al comienzo de la Segunda Guerra Mundial estaba equipado con el Huracán Hawker. Como componente de la Fuerza Expedicionaria Británica, luchó por Bélgica y Francia. Al regresar a Gran Bretaña, se asignaron tareas de patrulla a la unidad sobre la base de la Royal Navy en Scape Flow y, desde abril de 1941, operaron sobre el sur de Inglaterra como una unidad de caza nocturna. En febrero de 1943, la unidad fue reequipada con el Hawker Typhoon y un año después, la Tempest. Con estos aviones, la unidad se preparó para la invasión de Europa, pero se detuvo para defender el sur de Inglaterra contra la bomba voladora V-1. Cuando los sitios de lanzamiento de V-1 se desbordaron, fue uno de los escuadrones de Tempestad transferidos al continente europeo para apoyar el avance de las tropas aliadas hasta el final de la guerra. Permaneció en Alemania hasta mayo de 1999 como parte de las Fuerzas Aéreas Británicas de Ocupación (BAFO), 2º TAF y RAF Alemania. A principios de siglo, la unidad participó en los bombardeos de Kosovo, Sierra Leona, Irak y, en 2004, Afganistán. En marzo de 2006, la unidad recibió el Eurofighter Typhoon. A principios de junio de 1944, el código del Escuadrón No. 3 se cambió de QO a JF, que se usó hasta agosto de 1945. Las llamadas “rayas de invasión” también se agregaron a los aviones serialed JN765 antes de la operación. Groundcrew pintó de negro la sección inferior de la cubierta del tren de aterrizaje principal en negro, aparentemente por error.

    Introducción:
    La historia de la Tempestad no es más que un intento de abordar las deficiencias de Hawker Typhoon, que le impidió ser un luchador exitoso. El principal problema del Typhoon era el ala gruesa con perfil NACA 22, que ofrecía mucho espacio interior para combustible y armamento, pero generaba resistencia rápidamente con el aumento de la velocidad. No es sorprendente que el ala estuviera en el centro de los cambios en el camino hacia el nuevo luchador. Originalmente se suponía que el diseño resultante retendría el nombre de Typhoon como Mark II, pero se hizo evidente, el resultado sería un nuevo avión, por lo que el nombre se cambió a Tempest, siguiendo el camino tradicional de Hawker para usar el “viento”. nombres para sus luchadores.

     

    Serie de cambios
    El ala nueva era 5 pulgadas (12,7 cm) más delgada en la raíz y también la forma del plano cambió en comparación con el ala Typhoon a una forma más elíptica. Como la nueva ala no ofrecía suficiente espacio para combustible, se tuvo que instalar un tanque de combustible adicional de 76 galones (288 l) en el fuselaje. El espacio para ello se encontró entre el cortafuegos y el tanque de aceite, pero, en consecuencia, fue necesario mover el motor hacia adelante en 21 pulgadas (53,4 cm). Debido a eso, las superficies de la cola, tanto el estabilizador como el elevador, tuvieron que ampliarse, también se reconstruyó el tren de aterrizaje. Entonces, sí, era un avión nuevo, aunque conservaba el motor Typhoon, que era un problema muy complejo en sí mismo. Con objetivos bastante ambiciosos con respecto al rendimiento de Tempest, se consideraron nuevas unidades en lugar de la problemática Napier Saber II que impulsa el Typhoon. Pero las cosas salieron de otra manera …

    De vuelta a las raíces
    El contrato inicial se colocó para dos prototipos basados ​​en los aviones Typhoon impulsados ​​por Sabre IV, pero debido a retrasos, solo se instaló el HM599, mientras que el HM595 usó el antiguo Sabre II. Los dos prototipos también diferían en el diseño del radiador, ya que el HM595 retuvo el distintivo radiador de mentón de Typhoon, mientras que el HM599 sufrió un cambio radical a medida que Sydney Camm, el diseñador jefe de Hawker, quería racionalizar el diseño. El radiador se movió hacia el borde delantero de las secciones internas del ala en ambos lados y la elegante nariz se parecía un poco al Spitfire. El diseño de los radiadores montados en las alas funcionó bien aerodinámicamente, pero el Sabre IV mostró múltiples problemas y también la complejidad del ensamblaje del ala con radiadores integrados fue motivo de preocupación.

     

    Solo había otras dos unidades lo suficientemente potentes para usar con la Tempestad en lugar de Sabre IV: el R&R Griffon y el radial Centaurus IV de Bristol. Como se eligió definitivamente el nuevo nombre Tempest, se asignaron diferentes marcas a cada variante del motor y se ordenaron cuatro prototipos más. El Mk.I debía ser impulsado por el Sabre IV (HM599), el Mk.II por el Centaurus IV (LA602 y LA607), el Mk.III por el R&R Griffon IIB (LA610) y el Mk.IV por el Griffon 61 (LA614). Finalmente, el Mk.V (HM595) usó una versión ligeramente mejorada del Sabre II (IIB) que produce 2,400 hp (1790 kW), por lo tanto 200 hp (147 kW) más que la versión anterior. Aunque se pensó como una solución provisional hasta que los motores Sabre IV estuvieran disponibles, finalmente surgió como la variante principal de la Tempestad, porque Centaurus era demasiado tarde, Saber Mk.IV todavía estaba preocupado por fallas e integración del Griffon en la estructura del tifón. resultó ser más exigente de lo esperado. Así que Mk.III terminó con el primer y único prototipo, mientras que Mk.IV nunca se construyó.

    La leyenda nace
    El prototipo HM595 con Sabre II voló por primera vez el 2 de septiembre de 1942, equipado con el dosel de la puerta del automóvil, ya que el dosel de burbujas estaba en desarrollo en ese momento. El HM599 aerodinámico con Sabre IV realizó su primer vuelo el 24 de febrero de 1943. Era razonablemente más rápido que el HM595, pero la solución de los problemas tomaría demasiado tiempo. La forma más fácil de llevar la Tempestad al servicio era proceder con Mk.V.

    La primera producción de Tempest Mk.V realizó su primer vuelo el 21 de junio de 1943, ya equipado con un dosel de burbujas. Armado con cuatro cañones Hispano Mk.II de 20 mm (200 balas por barril) alcanzó una velocidad máxima de 432 mph (695 km / h) a 18,400 pies (5,600 m), hasta 45 mph (72 km / h) más que Bf 109 de Fw 190 (dependiendo de la marca). Después del primer lote de producción, se instalaron los cañones Hispano Mk.V, diferenciándolo del primer lote por barriles completamente cubiertos por el ala. El primer escuadrón en recibir Tempestad fue el No. 486 en enero de 1944. Junto con el Escuadrón No. 3 entró en funcionamiento en abril de 1944. Con la adición del Escuadrón No. 56, se formó el primer Ala de la Tempestad en Newchurch, Kent, bajo el mando de W / Cdr Roland Prosper „Bee“ Beamont.

     

    Luchando contra todo
    Después del período de operaciones en Francia después del Día D, el Ala de la Tempestad se encargó de luchar contra las Bombas Voladoras V-1 que viajan a baja velocidad a unas 400 mph (640 km / h). El Tempest Mk.V nunca fue un caza de alto nivel efectivo debido a la naturaleza de su motor, pero en los niveles medio y bajo fue superior a prácticamente todo. Y unos 640 V-1 destruidos durante el corto período entre junio y agosto de 1944 hablan por sí mismos, ya que el resto de la RAF anotó unos 160 de ellos durante el período.

    Después de que cesó la campaña de bombardeos V-1, los Escuadrones de la Tempestad volvieron a las tareas comunes. En ese momento, siete escuadrones de Tempest estaban volando combates aire-aire y reclamaron 240 asesinatos (unos 20 de ellos aviones Me 262). El as de Tempest más exitoso, D. C. Fairbanks (EE. UU.) Registró 11 asesinatos volando Mk.V „Terror of Rheine“. En segundo lugar con nueve asesinatos llegaron W. E. Schrader (NZ) con nueve y J. J. Payton con seis asesinatos emergieron como terceros en la general. El piloto de tempestad más famoso, el francés libre Pierre Clostermann, agregó cuatro asesinatos a su cuenta de 11 (algunas fuentes indican 18 asesinatos, se desconoce el número exacto).

    Tempest era un luchador formidable, rápido, duro, con armas poderosas. Gracias al excelente rendimiento a baja altitud, los ataques de estrangulamiento también fueron bastante comunes, generalmente durante los viajes de “buscar y destruir”. Además de los cañones, la provisión de dos bombas de 1000 lb (450 kg) u ocho cohetes de 60 lb (27 kg) se sumaron a la fuerza destructiva.

    Hasta el final de una era
    Dos variantes más de Tempest entrarían en producción más adelante, pero ambas llegaron demasiado tarde para ver el servicio de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. El Tempest Mk.II impulsado por el Centaurus V utilizó algo de experiencia obtenida al examinar el capó del motor de los Fw 190 capturados. El Tempest VI usó el motor Sabre V, y solo lo usaron cinco escuadrones de la RAF con base en el Medio Oriente. De la tempestad Mk.V se produjeron 1.401. Después de la guerra, Tempest V continuó en servicio con los escuadrones de la Fuerza Aérea de Ocupación Británica (BAFO) hasta ser reemplazado por Tempest Mk.II.

  • Spitfire Mk. IXc late version 1/48

    Sold out

    ED8281

    27,95
    ENGLISH

    ProfiPACK edition kit of British fighter aircraft Spitfire Mk.IXc (late version) in 1/48 scale. REEDITION.
    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 6
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, color
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: no

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición ProfiPACK del avión de combate británico Spitfire Mk.IXc (última versión) en escala 1/48. REEDICION
    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 6
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, color
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: no

  • Fw 190A-6 1/48

    ED82148

    27,95
    ENGLISH

    ProfiPACK edition kit of German WWII fighter aircraft Fw 190A-6 in 1/48 scale.

    Machines are from the Eastern and Western Front.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    marking options: 5
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, pre-painted
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: no

     

    Marking options:
    A) flown by Lt. Heinz-Günther Lück, 1./JG 1, Deelen, the Netherlands, August 1943
    B) W. Nr. 550461, flown by Oblt. Helmut Radtke, 5./JG 54, Immola, Finland, Summer 1944
    C) W. Nr. 550453, flown by Hptm. Friedrich-Karl Müller, Stab./JG 300, Bonn-Hangelar, Germany, October 1943
    D) flown by Fw. Günther Josten, 1./JG 51, Bobruysk, Soviet Union, January 1944
    E) W. Nr. 550473, flown by Fw. Walter Nietzsche, II./JG 300, Rheine, Germany, Summer 1943

     

    Intro:

    The second half of the Second World War saw the Focke-Wulf Fw 190, in its various forms, emerge as the best of what was available to the Luftwaffe. The dedicated fighter version was a high performance, heavily armed machine.

     

    Its development had a precarious beginning, against a 1938 specification issued by the Technisches Amt, RLM. The first prototype took to the air on June 1st, 1939. After a series of improvements and even radical changes, the design culminated in the fall of 1940 in the pre-series version Fw 190A-0 to the tune of twenty-eight pieces. Six of these were retained by the test unit Erprobungsstaffel 190 at Rechlin, which was tasked with conducting service trials. These revealed a wide range of flaws to the point where the RLM halted further development. Despite this, on the basis of urgings from the test unit staff, the aircraft was not shelved. After a series of some fifty modifications, the RLM gave the go ahead for the Fw 190 to be taken into inventory of the Luftwaffe.

     

    In June 1941 the Luftwaffe accepted the first of 100 ordered Fw 190A-1s, armed with four 7.9 mm MG 17s. By September 1941 II./JG 26 was completely equipped with the type operating on the Western Front. November saw the production of the next version Fw190A-2, powered by a BMW 801C-2, and armed with two 7.9 mm MG 17s and two MG 151s of 20 mm caliber in the wings. Part of this series received an additional pair of 20 mm MG FFs, thus attaining an armament standard of later types. Asignificant advancement to the design came in the spring 1942, when the BMW 801D-2 became available, who´s installation gave birth to the Fw 190A-3. July saw the development of the improved A-4. Both were armed with what became the standard two fuselage mounted MG 17s, two wing mounted MG 151 cannons, and two MG FF cannons, placed inboard of the wheel wells.

     

    During 1942 production had intensified, and a production facility was set up under license at Fieseler. Thanks in part to this, production rose in 1942 to 1,878 units as opposed to 224 in 1941. Large-scale production of the A-5 was initiated in April 1943 with an identical wing to the A-4, but with a nose extension that would become standard on all subsequent Fw 190A versions up to the A-9, and also on the corresponding F types. July saw the development of a new, strengthened wing, which incorporated MG 151s instead of the MG FFs in the outer position. The adoption of this wing developed the A-6 version. Further changes developed the A-7, produced during the end of 1943. This version came about with the replacement of the fuselage mounted MG 17s with 13 mm MG 131s.

     

    Further improvements led to the Fw 190A-8, and this version became the most widely produced with some 1400 units made. The most significant change to this variant was the installation of the GM-1 nitrous-oxide injection system, for temporary power boost in combat. Aportion of A-8 production was built as the A-8/R2 and A-8/R8, armed with MK 108 cannon in the outer wing location, and with armoured slabs added to the cockpit sides and a modified canopy. The final production version of the BMW 801 powered fighter was the Fw 190A-9, equipped with the BMW 801TS of 2000 hp (1470 kW).

     

    There was a parallel development of these fighter optimized aircraft with a dedicated fighter-bomber version, the Fw 190F. These aircraft had reduced wing armament to two MG 151 cannons in the wing root position. The engine was optimized for low level operation, and the armament options varied to satisfy the ground attack role, including bombs of various weight classes and a variety of anti-tank rockets. This branched into the extended range Fw 190G version.

     

    Development of the throughbred fighter continued in the guise of the Fw 190D, which began to reach Luftwaffe units in the second half of 1944, and was the result of mounting an in-line Jumo 213A-1 engine into a modified Fw 190A-8 airframe. Although the Fw 190 never achieved the widespread usage of the competing Bf 109, its contribution to the German Air Force was certainly significant through the second half of WWII.

     

    Fw 190s saw service on the Western Front as well as in the East. As heavy fighters with imposing firepower, they found themselves integral components, from 1943 onwards, within the units tasked with the protection of the Reich from the ominous clouds of allied fourengined bombers. This is where the A-8 version was instrumental, along with it´s A-8/R2 armoured development. This version, with its firepower, was a very ominous and daunting foe for the bomber crews. From the second half of 1944, their danger was kept in check to a degree by escorting P-47s, and necessitated the development of the P-51 Mustang.

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición ProfiPACK de aviones de combate alemanes de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Fw 190A-6 en escala 1/48.

    Las máquinas son del frente oriental y occidental.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    opciones de marcado: 5
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, prepintadas
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: no

     

    Opciones de marcado:
    A) volado por el teniente Heinz-Günther Lück, 1./JG 1, Deelen, Países Bajos, agosto de 1943
    B) W. Nr. 550461, volado por Oblt. Helmut Radtke, 5./JG 54, Immola, Finlandia, verano de 1944
    C) W. Nr. 550453, volado por Hptm. Friedrich-Karl Müller, Stab./JG 300, Bonn-Hangelar, Alemania, octubre de 1943
    D) volado por Fw. Günther Josten, 1./JG 51, Bobruysk, Unión Soviética, enero de 1944
    E) W. Nr. 550473, volado por Fw. Walter Nietzsche, II./JG 300, Rheine, Alemania, verano de 1943

     

    Introducción:

    La segunda mitad de la Segunda Guerra Mundial vio al Focke-Wulf Fw 190, en sus diversas formas, emergente como lo mejor de lo que estaba disponible para la Luftwaffe. La versión de combate relacionada era una máquina de alto rendimiento, fuertemente armada.

     

    Su desarrollo tuvo un comienzo precario, contra una especificación de 1938 emitida por Technisches Amt, RLM. El primer prototipo salió al aire el 1 de junio de 1939. Después de una serie de mejoras e incluso cambios radicales, el diseño culminó en el otoño de 1940 en la versión previa a la serie Fw 190A-0 con la melodía de veintiocho piezas. Seis de estos fueron retenidos por la unidad de prueba Erprobungsstaffel 190 en Rechlin, que se encargó de realizar pruebas de servicio. Estos revelaron una amplia gama de fallas hasta el punto en que el RLM detuvo el desarrollo posterior. A pesar de esto, sobre la base de instancias del personal de la unidad de prueba, el avión no fue archivado. Después de una serie de unas cincuenta modificaciones, el RLM dio el visto bueno para el Fw 190 fuera incluido en el inventario de la Luftwaffe.

     

    En junio de 1941, la Luftwaffe aceptó el primero de los 100 Fw 190A-1 ordenados, armado con cuatro MG 17 de 7,9 mm. En septiembre de 1941, II./JG 26 estaba completamente equipado con el tipo que operaba en el frente occidental. Noviembre vio la producción de la próxima versión Fw190A-2, impulsada por un BMW 801C-2, y armado con dos MG 17 de 7.9 mm y dos MG 151 de calibre 20 mm en las alas. Parte de esta serie recibió un par adicional de MG FF de 20 mm, logrando así un estándar de armamento de tipos posteriores. Un avance significativo en el diseño se produjo en la primavera de 1942, cuando el BMW 801D-2 estuvo disponible, cuya instalación dio a luz al Fw 190A-3. En julio se desarrolló el A-4 mejorado. Ambos estaban armados con lo que se convirtió en los dos MG 17 montados en el fuselaje estándar, dos cañones MG 151 montados en las alas y dos cañones MG FF, colocados dentro de los pozos de las ruedas.

     

    Durante 1942 la producción se había intensificado, y se instaló una instalación de producción bajo licencia en Fieseler. Gracias en parte a esto, la producción aumentó en 1942 a 1,878 unidades en comparación con 224 en 1941. La producción a gran escala del A-5 se inició en abril de 1943 con un ala idéntica al A-4, pero con una extensión de la nariz que se convertiría en estándar en todas las versiones posteriores de Fw 190A hasta el A-9, y también en los tipos F correspondientes. Julio vio el desarrollo de un ala nueva y reforzada, que incorporó MG 151 en lugar de los MG FF en la posición exterior. La adopción de este ala desarrolló la versión A-6. Otros cambios desarrollaron el A-7, producido a fines de 1943. Esta versión se produjo con el reemplazo de los MG 17 montados en el fuselaje con MG 131 de 13 mm.

     

    Otras mejoras controladas al Fw 190A-8, y esta versión se verán en la mayor cantidad de unidades producidas con unas 1400 unidades fabricadas. El cambio más significativo en esta variante fue la instalación del sistema de inyección de óxido nitroso GM-1, para un impulso temporal de potencia en combate. Una parte de la producción de A-8 se construyó como A-8 / R2 y A-8 / R8, armada con cañón MK 108 en la ubicación del ala exterior, y con las persianas blindadas a los lados de la cabina y una cubierta modificada La versión de producción final del caza motorizado BMW 801 fue el Fw 190A-9, equipado con el BMW 801TS de 2000 hp (1470 kW).

     

    Hubo un desarrollo paralelo de estos aviones de combate optimizados con una versión dedicada de cazabombardero, el Fw 190F. Estos aviones habían reducido el armamento del ala a dos cañones MG 151 en la posición de la raíz del ala. El motor fue optimizado para una operación de bajo nivel, y las opciones de armamento variaron para satisfacer el rol de ataque terrestre, incluidas bombas de varias clases de peso y una variedad de cohetes antitanque. Esto se ramificó en la versión de rango extendido Fw 190G.

    El desarrollo de la caza de raza continua rápidamente bajo la apariencia del Fw 190D, que comenzó a llegar a las unidades de la Luftwaffe en la segunda mitad de 1944, y fue el resultado de montar un motor Jumo 213A-1 en línea en una célula Fw 190A-8 modificada. Aunque el Fw 190 nunca cambió el uso generalizado del competidor Bf 109, su contribución a la Fuerza Aérea Alemana fue significativamente durante la segunda mitad de la Segunda Guerra Mundial.

     

    Fw 190s vio servicio en el frente occidental, así como en el este. Como combatientes pesados ​​con una potencia de fuego imponente, se encontraron componentes integrales, desde 1943 en adelante, dentro de las unidades encargadas de la protección del Reich de las ominosas nubes de bombarderos aliados. Aquí es donde está la versión A-8 fue instrumental, junto con su desarrollo blindado A-8 / R2. Esta versión, con su potencia de fuego, era un enemigo muy siniestro y desalentador para los equipos de bombarderos. Desde la segunda mitad de 1944, su peligro fue controlado hasta cierto punto escoltando a los P-47, y requirió el desarrollo del Mustang P-51.

     

  • Bf 108 1/32

    ED3006

    35,95
    ENGLISH

     

    ESPAÑOL

     

  • Lysander Mk.III 1/48

    ED11138

    27,50
    ENGLISH

     

    ESPAÑOL

     

  • Bf 109G-14 1/48

    ED82118

    27,95
    ENGLISH

    ProfiPACK edition kit of German WWII fighter aircraft Bf 109G-14 in 1/48 scale.

    The model can be finished with two versions of canopy, tail and tailwheel.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 5
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, color
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición ProfiPACK de aviones de combate alemanes de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Bf 109G-14 en escala 1/48.

    El modelo se puede terminar con dos versiones de dosel, cola y rueda de cola.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 5
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, color
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: no

  • Spitfire Mk.VIII 1/48

    ED84159

    16,25
    ENGLISH

     

    ESPAÑOL

     

  • Fokker D.VII(Alb) 1/72

    ED70134

    13,40
    ENGLISH

     

    ESPAÑOL

     

  • MiG-21bis 1/144

    ED4436

    7,95
    ENGLISH

     

    ESPAÑOL

     

  • A-4F 1/144

    ED4466

    7,50
    ENGLISH

    Super 44 edition kit of US jet aircraft A-4F in 1/144 scale.
    plastic parts: Platz
    No. of decal options: 4
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: no

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de la edición Super 44 del avión estadounidense A-4F en escala 1/144.
    piezas de plástico: Platz
    No de opciones de calcas: 4
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: no

  • F6F-5 1/144

    ED4463

    7,50
    ENGLISH

    Super 44 edition kit of US WWII fighter aircraft F6F-5 in 1/144 scale.

    plastic parts: Platz
    marking options: 4
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: no

     

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de la edición Super 44 del avión de combate estadounidense F6F-5 de la Segunda Guerra Mundial en escala 1/144.

    piezas de plástico: Platz
    opciones de marcado: 4
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: no

  • EDPACK 01

    EDPACK01

    39,65
    ENGLISH

    ¡Save your money with this amazing Super pack!

     

    ESPAÑOL

    ¡Ahora dinero con este fantástico Súper PACK!

     

  • EDPACK 02

    EDPACK02

    39,35
    ENGLISH

     

    Save your money with this amazing PACK!

     

    ESPAÑOL

     

    ¡Ahorra dinero con este increíble PACK!

     

  • Fw 190D-9 1/144

    ED4461

    7,50
    ENGLISH

    Super 44 edition kit of German WWII fighter aircraft Fw 190D-9 in 1/144 scale.
    plastic parts: Platz
    No. of decal options: 4
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Super 44 kit de edición de aviones de combate alemanes de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Fw 190D-9 en escala 1/144.
    piezas de plástico: Platz
    No de opciones de calcas: 4
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: no

  • F6F-5 1/72

    ED7450

    8,95
    ENGLISH

    Weekend edition kit of US WWII fighter aircraft F6F-5 in 1/72 scale.
    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 2
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask:no
    resin parts: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición de fin de semana del avión de combate estadounidense F6F-5 de la Segunda Guerra Mundial en escala 1/72.
    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 2
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: no
    piezas de resina: no

  • Spitfire Mk. VIII 1/72

    ED7442

    9,95
    ENGLISH

    Weekend edition kit of Spitfire Mk.VIII in 1/72 scale.
    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 2
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask: no
    resin parts: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición de fin de semana de Spitfire Mk.VIII en escala 1/72.
    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 2
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: no
    piezas de resina: no

  • F6F-5N Nightfighter 1/72

    ED7434

    9,95
    ENGLISH

    Scale kit of F6F-5N in 72nd scale in Weekend Edition.
    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 2
    Decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de escala de F6F-5N en escala 72 en Weekend Edition.
    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 2
    Calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: no

  • L-39C 1/72

    ED7418

    11,50
    ENGLISH

    The Weekend edition brings you the cheap variant of Eduard kit L-39C, 1/72 scale.

    L-39C Albatros, 00-0439 (N439RS) of the 412th Test Wing
    User friendly decals in high quality are designed and printed by Eduard and covers very unusual and attractive camo scheme for L-39 use by the USAF.

    This kit, in very fair price, contains neither photo-etch, or the painting mask.

    MODEL LENGTH: 175mm
    WINGSPAN: 130mm
    PLASTIC PARTS: 63

    MADE IN CZECH REPUBLIC

    ESPAÑOL

    La edición Weekend ofrece la variante barata del kit Eduard L-39C, escala 1/72.

    L-39C Albatros, 00-0439 (N439RS) del ala de prueba 412
    Las calcas fáciles de usar de alta calidad están diseñadas e impresas por Eduard y cubren un esquema de camuflaje muy inusual y atractivo para el uso de L-39 por parte de la USAF.

    Este kit, a un precio muy justo, no contiene fotograbado ni la máscara de pintura.

    LONGITUD MODELO: 175 mm
    ENVERGADURA: 130mm
    PIEZAS DE PLÁSTICO: 63

    HECHO EN REPÚBLICA CHECA

  • Spitfire HF Mk. VIII 1/72

    ED70129

    13,50
    ENGLISH

    ProfiPACK edition kit of British WWII fighter aircraft Spitfire HF Mk.VIII in 1/72 scale.

    The kit is focused on aircraft with pointed wings.
    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 5
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, pre-painted
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición ProfiPACK del avión de combate británico de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Spitfire HF Mk.VIII en escala 1/72.

    El kit está enfocado en aviones con alas puntiagudas.
    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 5
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, prepintadas
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: no

  • Spitfire Mk. IXe 1/72

    ED70123

    13,50
    ENGLISH

    ProfiPACK edition kit of British WWII fighter aircraft Spitfire Mk.IXe in 1/72 scale.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 5
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, color
    painting mask: yes
    resin parts: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición ProfiPACK del avión de combate británico de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Spitfire Mk.IXe en escala 1/72.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 5
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, color
    máscara de pintura: sí
    piezas de resina: no

  • Spitfire F Mk. IX 1/72

    ED70122

    13,50
    ENGLISH

    Spitfire F Mk.IX 1/72 in ProfiPACK edition.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 4
    decals: Eduard
    resin parts: no
    PE parts: yes, color
    painting mask: yes

    ESPAÑOL

    Spitfire F Mk.IX 1/72 en la edición ProfiPACK.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 4
    calcas: Eduard
    piezas de resina: no
    Piezas de PE: sí, color
    máscara de pintura: sí

  • Fw 190F-8 1/72

    ED70119

    13,50
    ENGLISH

    Fw 190F-8 1/72 in ProfiPACK edition. First release of this variant based on 2016 tool.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 5
    Decals: Eduard
    PE parts: yes, color
    painting mask: yes

    ESPAÑOL

    Fw 190F-8 1/72 en la edición ProfiPACK. Primer lanzamiento de esta variante basada en la herramienta 2016.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 5
    Calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: sí, color
    máscara de pintura: sí

  • Bf 109E-4 1/48

    ED84153

    16,50
    ENGLISH

    Weekend edition kit of German WWII fighter aircraft Bf 109E-4 in 1/48 scale.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 2
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask:no
    resin parts: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Kit de edición de fin de semana de aviones de combate alemanes de la Segunda Guerra Mundial Bf 109E-4 en escala 1/48.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 2
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: no
    piezas de resina: no

  • Albatros D. III OEFFAG 253 1/48

    ED84152

    12,50
    ENGLISH

    scale 1/48 Plastic kit

    Aircraft Weekend edition

    manufacturer: Eduard

    ESPAÑOL

    kit de plástico escala 1/48

    Avion Edición de fin de semana

    Fabricante: Eduard

  • Bf 109G-6 Erla 1/48

    ED84142

    16,50
    ENGLISH

    Weekend edition of Bf 109G-6 Erla in 1/48 scale.

    plastic parts: Eduard
    No. of decal options: 2
    decals: Eduard
    PE parts: no
    painting mask: no
    resin parts: no

    ESPAÑOL

    Edición de fin de semana de Bf 109G-6 Erla en escala 1/48.

    piezas de plástico: Eduard
    No de opciones de calcas: 2
    calcas: Eduard
    Piezas de PE: no
    máscara de pintura: no
    piezas de resina: no

  • Bf 110G-2 1/48

    ED84140

    21,95